How digital learning can ease the impact of COVID on a child’s education

Helping children learn remotely in the pandemic has been a key challenge, but parents and educators are embracing research-proven digital learning tools to help children get back on track


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SPONSORED BY Age of Learning

Last spring, remote learning became part of everyday life for millions of families in the UK and around the globe. Parents suddenly faced juggling the demands of work while trying to educate their children at home.

Many children fell behind with school closures, often described as the “COVID slide”, and are now entering the new school year with a greater need than ever for learning support. As a result, parents and educators are increasingly looking to new, flexible solutions to help children catch up and get ahead.

With more than a decade of providing research-proven digital learning solutions for children, Age of Learning, creator of award-winning ABCmouse, has a deep understanding of how digital learning can help.

“Our approach is designed entirely around learning outcomes and helping children develop a lifelong love of learning,” says Rob Gilby, executive vice president and managing director, international, at Age of Learning.

ABCmouse is a comprehensive digital learning program for young children, which includes 850 lessons with more than 10,000 standards-based activities that build fundamental skills in literacy, maths, science, social studies, art and music

“We focus on three core strengths: curriculum, creativity and enabling technology. Our team of learning experts, dedicated to delivering measurable improvements for kids, is at the heart of all our products. Our flagship product ABCmouse is a comprehensive digital learning program for young children, which includes 850 lessons with more than 10,000 standards-based activities that build fundamental skills in literacy, maths, science, social studies, art and music.”

ABCmouse inspires confidence in children to learn, to grow, to excel. “Our second principle is that learning is more effective when the child is excited about learning and develops a curiosity and passion,” says Gilby. “We use video, animation, music and gamification techniques to build interest in learning and deliver measurable outcomes. It may feel like play to the child, yet it’s delivering real outcomes.”

A recent example of this is the launch of WordPlay, Age of Learning’s new video series in its Adventure Academy learning game for children aged 8 to 13. WordPlay was created and hosted by award-winning children’s author Kwame Alexander to inspire and teach children to write short stories.

“Our third principle is to enable adaptive learning, personalised for every child and measured to best support effective learning outcomes,” says Gilby. “We believe every child is unique and that learning should be too. We do this through extensive investment and research to build custom-designed, patented technology platforms.

“Our learning solutions are available on multiple digital platforms and offline, allowing greater access during remote learning and flexibility for teachers. We know it’s key to support parents and educators with tools that make the learning journey fun and effective, whether kids are learning in the classroom or at home.

“We believe in the huge potential of our young learners and we hope to instil a lifelong love of learning in children through our products. While these are unsettling times, we appreciate the commitment and resourcefulness of parents and educators, and the valuable contribution digital learning brings to the educational community.”

For more information please visit www.ageoflearning.com